Container and Small-Space Gardening | DIY

Gardening in Small Spaces

Garden / June 5, 2016

If your green thumb is a little, um, brown, a low-maintenance plant, like echeveria shown here, is a safe bet. Thanks to their ability to store water in their fleshy leaves, stems and roots, succulents require very little watering — but they do require plenty of sun. Position the pots where they will receive at least 2-4 hours of direct sunlight each day and water sparingly only when the topsoil is completely dry, about every 10 days.

Grow Tomatoes From Seed

A little early planning and a few packets of seed are all you need to grow a bumper crop of the country's most popular homegrown veggie. Establish the seedlings indoors then transfer them to a waiting pot in a sunny spot for a summer's-worth of fresh produce.

Garden Vertically

Perfect for the smallest of outdoor spaces, this multi-pocket fabric wall planter from Burgon & Ball offers a kitchen garden's-worth of planting space for an assortment of fresh herbs like rosemary, thyme, chives and basil. Irrigation holes in each pocket allow excess water to drain away, ensuring plants stay moist but not overly wet.

Hanging Herb and Veggie Basket

Plant a hanging basket with cherry tomatoes and an assortment of herbs — like basil, rosemary, thyme, oregano or parsley — to keep fresh seasonings for an Italian dinner within easy reach.

Save Space With Raised Beds

Make the most of even the smallest amount of gardening space with tiered beds. Easier to maintain than a traditional garden (plants are at a more comfortable level) these elevated containers also warm up sooner in the spring and stay warmer later into fall than a traditional garden making your patio or rooftop the envy of the neighborhood.

Pot a Variety

Combining several small plants together in one pot is a great way to mix colors and textures. Plus, since young, small plants are typically cheaper than mature ones, it's also a budget-friendly option. To make brightly colored flowers — like this pink kalanchoe and zinnia — really pop, plant them in a terra cotta pot that has been painted a flat black.

Green Dining

Designer Jamie Durie turned this underused patio into a private outdoor dining room for a couple who were eager to combine two passions: gardening and entertaining. A pergola provides shade and gives this outdoor space a secluded feel while a wall covered in edible-plant-filled pouches puts fresh veggies within easy reach so guests can help themselves.

Source: www.hgtv.com